New Fuel Line

New Fuel Line

So as I had noted in my last post, I felt that the main section of fuel line had to be replaced. I ordered a twenty-foot coil of 3/8″ copper-nickel fuel line and used my brake flare kit to set up a double-flare on each end. This line replaced what had previously been three sections of different types of tubing extending from the gas tank to the engine bay, each joined by rubber tubing and hose clamps.

Tubing Straightening Tool

Tubing Straightening Tool

The new line replaces all of that – the only line left in place was a nicely bent section extending from the driver’s side of the engine bay to the passenger side, where it connected to the fuel pump. From the fuel pump there is one more section of line extending to the fuel filter, which is then directly connected to the carburetor. I used an air compressor to blow out the lines I retained after they were drained of fuel.

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Stumbling Along

Stumbling Along

Within a week or so after replacing the differential oil, Cornelius started to complain a little when going uphill. This was in the form of stumbling when the accelerator was applied.

Durex Fuel Filter Prior to Cleaning

Durex Fuel Filter Prior to Cleaning

My first steps were to check the fuel system and to clean the fuel filters in both the Durex Fuel Filter itself, and the fuel filter contained within the fuel pump. In the Durex unit, the fuel filter is composed of a brass porous element, which I cleaned by agitating it in Chemtool B-12 fuel system cleaner, then blowing through it with compressed air. The fuel pump filter was a brass screen, which was cleaned in a similar fashion.

The result of these efforts? Still stumbling.

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That’s Rad!

That’s Rad!

At this point the truck is running pretty well, however I have been noticing some small leaks at the thermostat housing on top of the

Damaged Radiator Inlet

Damaged Radiator Inlet

head and there are also at least two or three small leaks within the radiator itself. On top of that, part of the lip on the radiator filler inlet has broken off, which does not allow the radiator cap to fasten properly. I have some work cut out for me. This effort pretty much takes up the month of July, all told.

Removing The Grille and Radiator

Removing The Grille and Radiator

I first start by sourcing parts, and thanks to the Old IHC forum (The finest IHC forum and excellent source of information, in my opinion, and not just because I have been one of the admins there since 2009!) I was able to obtain a part number for the thermostat (Stant 13368 / 180 degree). The thermostat housing gasket was available from Olson’s Gaskets (Very friendly, knowledgeable service).

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Support

Support

Until I came across a set of halfway decent hood support rods on eBay, I had been propping the hood open on the front lacing.

Hood Supports as Purchased

Hood Supports as Purchased

This is risky, because the hood could slip off, and based on the number of scratches along the rear of the grille section and the scratched surface of the hood corner, this practice is hard on the hood as well.

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Tail Lights

Tail Lights

Originally on these trucks, you had ONE stop/tail light, and it was located on the driver’s side. On Cornelius, as I have seen on many others, people have added a stop/tail light on the passenger side. Then, turn signals, originally manual in nature, were added in the front and in the rear. The end result is an unsightly twin set of lights in the rear of the truck and more to maintain.

Stop / Turn / Tail Light - Passenger Side

Stop / Turn / Tail Light – Passenger Side

I decided I wanted to replace this twin set of lights with a single set of decent-looking stop / turn/ tail lights and began a search. Again, I could not find anything that represented an original set of lights, so I decided to find a set of lights that looked original for the application.

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New Shoes

New Shoes

I looked quite while for a set of artillery rims. One fella on eBay wanted $750 for a set of four rusty “versions” of artillery wheels (yikes!!) , so I decided to go another route. Wheel Smith manufactures some gorgeous reproduction wheels, and their artillery steelies looked perfect for Cornelius. So I had a set of five made up, to have one for the spare, of 15×6″ wheels, with a 5-1/4″ bolt circle and a 3-1/4″ backspace. Powder coated red, they look amazing. I had some triple diamond stainless reproduction hub caps that I purchased at Restoration Specialties, and Wheel Smith modified them perfectly to fit the new rims. Finally, I also purchased a set of stainless trim rings from Wheel Smith to top everything off.

Wheel Smith Red Artillery Rim With Coker White Walls

Wheel Smith Red Artillery Rim With Coker White Walls

So the rims are no good without a good set of tires, and for these I turned to Coker. I had been undecided as to whether to go for a set of radial “bias-ply look-a-likes” but decided to simply find a good set of bias ply tires for Cornelius instead and I am very happy that I went this route for several reasons: First, they are a LOT cheaper; second, Cornelius likely won’t be driven above 40 to 45 miles per hour occasionally – so it’s not like I will need radial drivability for highway excursions; and third, I had driven bias-ply tires on my ’53 IHC R-110 Series pickup for almost 12 years, so I am used to them, how they handle, and what their limitations are.

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